<h2>International Students at Indiana University</h2>
<h3>1891-2020</h3>
<p> The story of how Indiana University became a cosmopolitan hub</p>
<img src=“https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/40476943830/in/album-72157668798008468/”>
<p>Courtesy of IU Archives, P0077325</p>
<p>Students arrive from Thailand in 1957</p>
<h3>1891</h3>
<h4>The Foundations of International Education</h4>
<p>The first international students to study at IU were students from England and Canada during the mid-19th century. The first non-European was presumably Tekekuma Okada of Japan, who graduated in 1891.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/26TYemN”>
<p>Courtesy of IU Archives, P0023151</p>
<p>Tekekuma Okada, 1891</p>
<h3>1916</h3>
<h4>The Foundations of International Education </h4>
<p>The IU chapter of the Cosmopolitan Club is established. The club's main goal was to promote contacts between international and American students. Upon establishment, it represented the 12 international students who studied at IU in 1916. The club's heydays were during the 1950s and 1960s; it would stop operating at the end of the 1970s.</p>
<img src=“https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/41108141755/in/album-72157668798008468/”>
<p>Courtesy of IU Archives, P0054058 </p>
<p>Cosmopolitan Club, 1921</p>
<h3>1924</h3>
<h4>The Foundations of International Education </h4>
<p>Since the mid-1920s, Professor Flora Anderson of the Botany department served as advisor to foreign students. This position would grow in influence over the next few decades and would be responsible for many policies that made IU a home for a growing international student population.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/28ytM7m”>
<p>Courtesy of IU Archives, P0020664</p>
<p>Professor Flora Anderson</p>
<h3>1943</h3>
<h4>Leo Dowling appointed counselor for Foreign Students</h4>
<p>Dowling was appointed counselor for foreign students by IU president Herman B Wells. He was tasked with leading IU's international expansion. He also focused on the needs and well-being of international students. During his service, the international student population at IU grew from around 50 to almost 2,000.</p>
<img src=“https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/28410738128/in/album-72157668798008468/”>
<p>Courtesy of IU Archives, P0072851 </p>
<p>Leo Dowling</p>
<h3>1944</h3>
<h4>The International Education Revolution Starts</h4>
<p>When Dowling took office, there were 29 international students at IU. When he retired, there were almost 2,000. Today the number has surged to around 9,000.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/MwEgkm”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<p>IU Enrollment Trends 1943- 2016</p>
<h3>1957-1958</h3>
<h4>528 International Students</h4>
<p>International students constituted 2% of the total student body at IU. Top countries of origin in 1957: Thailand, Brazil, Philippines, Canada, Hungary, Korea, Taiwan, India, UK, Iraq and Egypt.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/28z9RK1”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<h3>1958</h3>
<h4>IU Opens a New International Center</h4>
<p>In the spring of 1951, under the leadership of Herman Wells and Leo Dowling, an international center was established in a house on campus. In 1958 the center moved to the newly renovated Alpha Chi Omega sorority house that had been built on south Jordan Avenue in the late 1920’s.</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/26JdfF5”>
<p>Courtesy of Office of Overseas Study</p>
<h3>1963</h3>
<h4>Foreign Student Advisory Committee Founded</h4>
<p>This official committee aimed to solve the manifold challenges that faced international students and the university. It dealt with organization, administration, academic requirements, social life and more.</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/JE8XJ5”>
<p>Courtesy of IU Archives, C181 Box 11</p>
<h3>1967-1968</h3>
<h4>1,041 International Students</h4>
<p> International students constituted 2.6% of the total student body at IU. Top countries of origin in 1967: Canada, Taiwan, Japan, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, UK, Korea, India, Hong Kong and Germany.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/26UCr4j”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<h3>1975</h3>
<h4>The Office of International Services is Officially Established</h4>
<p>The IAC (International Affairs Center) and International Student Services (ISS) merged into one unit under the title of Office of International Services (OIS)</p>
<img src=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/27416382337/in/dateposted-public/”>
<p>Courtesy of IU Archives, P0055999</p>
<p>Saudi students at IU in the 1970s</p>
<h3>1977-1978</h3>
<h4>1,917 International Students</h4>
<p>International students constituted 3.3% of the total student body at IU. Top countries of origin in 1977: Saudi Arabia, Iran, Canada, Taiwan, Nigeria, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand, Japan and Korea. The 1970s witnessed the rise of OPEC countries due to the oil boom of 1973. Citizens of Saudi Arabia, Iran, Nigeria, Venezuela and Libya became more prominent on IU’s campus.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/2433KVb”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<h3>1977</h3>
<h4>Leo Dowling Retires</h4>
<p>The driving force behind IU's international development retires. Kenneth Rogers replaces him as the Associate Dean and Director of International Services, as well as the head of the Office of Advisor to Foreign Students.</p>
<img src=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/27138478687/in/album-72157668798008468/”>
<p>Courtesy of IU Archives, P0065479 </p>
<h3>1978</h3>
<h4>American-Chinese Exchange of Scholars and Students Agreement</h4>
<p>This groundbreaking agreement will change the features of and dramatically increase the international population at Indiana University.</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/25GD3om”>
<p>Washington Post Archive</p>
<p>The Washington Post reports about the new agreement</p>
<h3>1979</h3>
<h4>Revolution in Iran</h4>
<p>This is a prominent example of how geopolitical events can affect the international student population at IU. A few years after the revolution, the number of Iranian students significantly declined.</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/25qmvGk”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<p>Number of Iranian students at IU </p>
<h3>1987-1988</h3>
<h4>2,226 International Students</h4>
<p>International students constituted 2.7% of the total student body at IU. Top countries of origin: Korea, Taiwan, China, Malaysia, Singapore, Canada, India, Japan, Saudi Arabia and Germany.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/28zUuyq”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<h3>1991</h3>
<h4>The Collapse of the Soviet Union </h4>
<p>The end of the Cold War had significant effects for IU and dramatically increased the number of international students who originated from Eastern Europe and Central Asia.</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/28yBp1b”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018 </p>
<p>Number of East European and Central Asian Students at IU</p>
<h3>1997-1998</h3>
<h4>3,285 International Students</h4>
<p>International students constituted 3.6% of the total student body at IU. Top countries of origin: Korea, Japan, China, Malaysia, Taiwan, India, Indonesia, Canada, Thailand and Brazil.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/My7yiw”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<h3>2007-2008</h3>
<h4>6,578 International Students</h4>
<p>International students constituted 6.6% of the total student body at IU. Top countries of origin: Korea, India, China, Taiwan, Saudi Arabia, Hong Kong, Japan, Canada, Indonesia and Turkey.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/29BB6ch”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<h3>2017-2018</h3>
<h4>8,555 International students</h4>
<p>International students constituted 9.4% of the total student body at IU. Top countries of origin: China, India, Korea, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan, Malaysia, Canada, Indonesia, Turkey and Iran.</p>
<img src=“https://flic.kr/p/28AA4bm”>
<p>Courtesy of Asher Lubotzky, 2018</p>
<h3>2018</h3>
<h4>Regions of the World</h4>
<p>More than 85% of IU international students are from Asia, and more than 53% are from East Asia specifically. The South Asian ratio has grown more than fourfold in the last six decades (from 5% to 21%). Sub-Saharan Africa is the most under-represented region with only 2.5%.</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/H966Hz”>
<h3>2018</h3>
<h4>China and India's Remarkable Rise</h4>
<p>More than 55% of international students at IU are either Chinese or Indian. In 1980, there were only 50 Indians and 4 Chinese students at IU.</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/26JaBA7”>
<h3>2018 </h3>
<h4>Are We Facing a Downward Trend?</h4>
<p>Beginning in 2016, there was a decrease of 230 international students at IU. In February 2018, IU president Michael McRobbie wrote a piece that appeared in the Chicago Tribune in which he expressed his apprehension with this downward trend, warning about potential grave repercussions. He stated, “The number of international students…declined last year for the first time in more than a decade...this is tremendously problematic...These students play an important part in the role colleges and universities have in furthering our nation’s foundations of openness, civility and prosperity."</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/243jiE3”>
<p>Courtesy of Chicago Tribune</p>
<h3>2018</h3>
<h4>Indiana University: From an All-American School to a Cosmopolitan Hub</h4>
<p>For decades, Indiana University has been a welcoming home for a thriving, steadily growing, international student community, ranked as one of the biggest in the US. This remarkable achievement has contributed to the academic excellence and social diversity of IU, benefitting both the university and its students as well as the state of Indiana at large.</p>
<img src=”https://flic.kr/p/29DUQLK”>
<p>Courtesy of IU McKinney School of Law</p>
<p>International students celebrate Thanksgiving 2015</p>
<h3>Sources</h3>
"C11, Box 4, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C47, Box 19, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C181, Box 11, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C181, Box 144, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C213, Box 319, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C237, Box 1, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C237, Box 4, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C268, Box 12, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C268, Box 117, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C268, Box 77, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C268, Box 307, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C459, Box 163, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C459, Box 40, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C459, Box 70, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
C459, Box 71, IU Libraries University Archives, Bloomington, Indiana.
Open Doors Magazine, 1985-1998
OVPIA Archive. Schoch, Lynn. International Students Files.
Bonner, Alice. ""U.S. and China Soon Begin Exchanging University Scholars."" The Washington Post, October 24, 1978. https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/politics/1978/10/24/us-and-china-soon-begin-exchanging-university-scholars/3e7d12f3-6a30-49e9-8b22-d72a7cfe170b/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.520aedc275ef.
McRobbie, Michael A. ""Commentary: Fewer International Students Are Coming to American Universities. That’s a Problem."" Chicago Tribune, February 19, 2018. http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/commentary/ct-perspec-students-international-american-universities-tuitions-0920-story.html.
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