<h3>IU and the American Presidency</h>

<p>This timeline focuses on the interactions between Indiana University Bloomington and U.S. presidents from James Madison to Barack Obama.</p>

< imgsrc=https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33826449356/in/dateposted-public/”alt=presidental seal”>

<h3>July 10, 1816 </h3>

<h4>James Madison Chooses IU's Destination</h4>

<p>By way of Congress's 1816 act to admit Indiana as a state in the union, the federal government gave land for the purpose of a seminary of learning. Eleven days after the act passed, President James Madison chose the township where the seminary was to be erected (1). The township became Bloomington and the seminary became Indiana University.</p>

<imgsrc=https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33758987660/in/album-72157682264959825/“alt=“Indiana State Map 1819”>

<p>DC035. Indiana Historical Society.</p>

<h3>December 31, 1858–January 25, 1859</h3>

<h4>Benjamin Harrison Testifies Against IU President</h4>

<p>On December 31, Benjamin Harrison, who was a lawyer in Indianapolis at the time, witnessed IU’s third president Rev. William Daily publicly drunk, stumbling down Washington Street (2). Harrison, along with several others, submitted his eyewitness testimony to the Methodist Episcopal Church, which was conducting a trial against Daily on charges of immorality (3). These charges included public intoxication and accosting a woman for "sensual purposes" (4). Amidst the scandal, Daily resigned from his presidency at IU and was later expelled from the Indiana Conference of the M.E. Church (5).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33826397886/in/album-72157682264959825/“alt=“William Daly”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0020861.</p>

<h3>October 21, 1896</h3>

<h4>Harrison Campaigns in Bloomington</h4>

<p>Three years after Benjamin Harrison’s presidential term, he participated in a train-stop campaign tour through Indiana to bolster support for Republican presidential contender William McKinley (6). The train’s engine and two cars were decorated with bunting; the front of the engine has a large picture of Harrison, and on either side was a large image of McKinley and his running mate (7). Harrison’s address in Bloomington disparaged the Democrats’ platform of silver coinage and discussed briefly the effects of the economic Panic of 1893, which continued until 1897 (8). About 3,000 people attended the event, which was a significant number considering the population of Bloomington was 6,500, according the 1890 census.</p>

<imgsrc=https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33826397536/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Harrison speaks to crowd in Bloomington”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0038280.</p>

<h3>10:00 AM January 21, 1915</h3>

<h4>Taft Gives IU Founders Day Address</h4>

<p>The IU Board of Trustees moved the celebration of Founders day from Jan. 20 to Jan. 21 so that William Taft could speak on campus (9). Taft, whose presidential term had ended two years prior, was the principal speaker at the Founders Day exercises. Following a processional that marched from Kirkwood to the Student Building, Taft gave a speech about the most pressing issues of the day: railroad rates, labor unions, and lawmaking (10).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33023743124/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Former President Taft in front of Maxwell Hall”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0027260.</p>

<h3>6:00 PM January 21, 1915</h3>

<h4>Taft Speaks at IU Law Dinner</h4>

<p>After attending the Founders Day celebration in Bloomington, William Taft traveled to Indianapolis to speak at a dinner hosted by the IU Law School. About 200 lawyers, many of whom had graduated from IU’s Law School, attended the dinner and warmly received Taft’s comments about how university education had improved since his law school days (11).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/34021844765/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Location of Law Dinner—Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, 1915”>

<p>W.H. Bass Photo Company Collection, Indiana Historical Society.</p>

<h3>July 2, 1917 – January 19, 1918</h3>

<h4>Hoover Writes to IU about Food Conservation</h4>

<p>During Herbert Hoover’s tenure as the head of the Food Administration before his presidential term, Hoover wrote to IU president William Lowe Bryan to encourage incorporating courses about food conservation (12). Food conservation was a hot topic touted by Hoover during World War I in order to save food for troops and people affected by the war (13). IU initiated new courses in the summer of 1917 in response to the request by Hoover.</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33864755472/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Thank you letter from Herbert Hoover to IU President William Lowe Bryan”>

<p>Indiana University President's Office correspondence, Collection C286, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.</p>

<h3>June 12, 1918</h3>

<h4>Roosevelt Gives Commencement Speech</h4>

<p>IU’s 1918 commencement speaker was Theodore Roosevelt. Dressed in cap and gown, Roosevelt addressed 6,000-8,000 people at the amphitheater that was located where the Chemistry Building now stands. In his opening remarks, Roosevelt said that the campus was one of the most beautiful he had ever seen. The rest of his speech centered on American nationalism and fighting for the U.S. in World War I (14).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33826398176/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Theodore Roosevelt (seated) at commencement”>

<p>1919 Arbutus, Indiana University</p>

<h3>May 1, 1922</h3>

<h4>IU Fundraising Group Meets Harding at White House</h4>

<p>IU President William Lowe Bryan and a group called the “flying squadron” met President Warren Harding at the White House. Their visit was part of a fundraising campaign, the goal of which was to raise $1 million dollars to build a dormitory, an outdoor sports facility, and a building with a large auditorium in honor of those whose lives had been sacrificed in World War I and other wars (15). These buildings would become Memorial Hall, Memorial Stadium, and the Indiana Memorial Union, respectively.</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33892314081/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”William Lowe Bryan and the "flying squadron" at the White House with Harding”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0031186.</p>

<h3>July 18, 1922</h3>

<h4>Harding Writes to IU President</h4>

<p>After IU President William Lowe Bryan and other IU representatives visited President Warren Harding at the White House, Harding wrote to Bryan. His letter told of his support of IU’s Memorial Drive, which raised funds to erect buildings in commemoration of those who had fought in various wars (16).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/34022057465/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=” Harding's letter to Bryan”>

<p>Indiana University President's Office correspondence, Collection C286, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.</p>

<h3>August 3, 1923</h3>

<h4>IU Cosmo Club Sends Condolences</h4>

<p>Upon the death of President Warren G. Harding, the IU Cosmopolitan Club, a club for international students to encourage international understanding, sent condolences to First Lady Harding. She responded with a card of gratitude (17). </p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33864919832/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Cosmopolitan Club scrapbook page of Harding condolences”>

<p>Cosmopolitan Club records, Collection C237, Indiana University Archives.</p>

<h3>December 1923</h3>

<h4>Coolidge Sends Greetings to Cosmo Clubs at IU</h4>

<p>In 1923, IU’s chapter of Cosmopolitan Club, was selected to be the national chapter and the location of the club’s national convention. The three day convention brought together about 250 delegates from different Cosmo Clubs across the nation. President Calvin Coolidge sent to the delegation a greeting praising the club’s mission (18).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33981216306/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Clipping with text from Coolidge's greeting”>

<p>San Diego Tribune clipping, Cosmopolitan Club records, Collection C237, Indiana University Archives.</p>

<h3>November 5, 1952 – November 28, 1952</h3>

<h4>Wells Congratulates Eisenhower on Victory</h4>

<p>IU President Herman B Wells sent President Dwight Eisenhower a telegram of congratulations upon Eisenhower’s election as president: “Indiana University congratulates the president of Columbia University on his great victory. We send you our sincere wishes for success in your effort to win peace and progress for our nation and pledge you our complete cooperation.” Eisenhower responded with a letter of thanks (left).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33892588691/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Letter of thanks from Eisenhower to Herman B Wells”>

<p>Indiana University President's Office records, Collection C213, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.</p>

<h3>January 20, 1953</h3>

<h4>IU Marching Hundred at Eisenhower's Inauguration</h4>

<p>The Marching Hundred performs in the parade that precluded President Dwight Eisenhower’s inaugural speech and oath.</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/34287556325/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Marching Hundred leaving assembly area to parade past President Eisenhower”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0027410.</p>

<h3>October 17, 1965</h3>

<h4>Nixon Gives IU Fall Convocations Lecture</h4>

<p>At the time that Richard Nixon visited IU, he wouldn’t be president for another four years but was campaigning loyally for his fellow Republicans for the midterm Congressional election. His visit at IU included press conferences, as well as a speech supporting President Lyndon Johnson’s Vietnam policy. About 150 anti-war students picketed against Nixon at Showalter Fountain. Another 50 students from other political organizations marched in support of Nixon’s Vietnam policy (19).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33023742964/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Nixon signs an IU student's book during his visit to campus”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0026320.</p>

<h3>June 1963</h3>

<h4>Johnson: “Can’t get Indiana off our mind”</h4>

<p>Prior to Elvis Stahr’s appointment as IU’s twelfth president, he was the U.S. Secretary of the Army under President John F. Kennedy. During his time in this position, Stahr rubbed elbows with Vice President Lyndon Johnson among other dignitaries. When Stahr was appointed as IU’s next president, Johnson sent him a congratulatory telegram (left).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33328857273/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=” Lyndon Johnson's congratulatory telegram to IU President Elvis J. Stahr”>

<p>Indiana University President's Office records, Collection C304, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.</p>

<h3>November 26, 1963</h3>

<h4>IU President Supports Johnson after JFK's Assassination</h4>

<p>Four days after John F. Kennedy’s assassination, IU President Stahr sent a solemn letter to President Lyndon Johnson in support of his new duties.</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/34099753036/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Elvis Stahr's letter of support after John F. Kennedy's assassination”>

<p Indiana University President's Office records, Collection C304, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.</p>

<h3>August 13, 1964</h3>

<h4>IU President Attends White House Meeting</h4>

<p>IU President Elvis Stahr attended a luncheon meeting with President Lyndon Johnson and about 80 college and university presidents. In Johnson’s speech, he said, “I wish you would keep us advised at the White House… of your really excellent, outstanding students who you think might be drawn into tours of public service… I am afraid from what some of you may have been teaching them, and what they may have heard from some of us politicians out on the stump, they may now be seeking to avoid it" (20).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33429030774/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Elvis Stahr in his office at IU”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0021822.</p>

<h3>November 9, 1967</h3>

<h4>Wells, Johnson, and South Vietnam</h4>

<p>President Wells and college presidents from five major universities in South Vietnam met with President Lyndon Johnson in the White House to discuss higher education in South Vietnam.</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33826398136/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Herman B Wells at a meeting with Lyndon Johnson (middle seated) and South Vietnamese higher education representatives”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0029673.</p>

<h3>April 18, 1968</h3>

<h4>Presidential candidate McCarthy Holds Rally</h4>

<p>About 3500 students “sat, stood or climbed trees” to hear presidential hopeful Eugene McCarthy speak at Dunn Meadow for a rally put on by Students for McCarthy, a student political group (21). The rally was complete with a semi-rock jazz group, a psych-rock musician, and a folk singer. After the rally in Dunn Meadow, he gave a campaign speech at the Auditorium, where he said, “Everyone in the United States, including the politicians, have been surprised at what an effect on politics you have been” (22). This visit was a part of his campaign tour in hopes of receiving the Democratic nomination for president.</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33450792914/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Eugene McCarthy at a student rally in Dunn Meadow”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0025360.</p>

<h3>April 24, 1968</h3>

<h4>Presidential candidate Robert Kennedy Campaigns at IU</h4>

<p>Ever since Robert F. Kennedy announced that he would run for the presidency late into the race for the Democratic ticket, IU students had anticipated his campaign visit. During his whirlwind tour around Indiana, he stopped in Bloomington. Upon his arrival, students crowded 7th street as his motorcade drove to the auditorium, where he was to speak (23). Kennedy’s talk focused on foreign relations and how the United States could help South Vietnam. The auditorium was packed to capacity, and there were speakers outside for those who could not fit inside (24).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33482272713/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Robert Kennedy shakes hands with IU student supporters”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0026706.</p>

<h3>April 27, 1968</h3>

<h4>Presidential candidate Branigin Visits IU</h4>

<p>Roger Branigin, who was Governor of Indiana at the time, was the favorite son candidate for the Indiana democratic primary in the 1968 presidential race. As a part of his campaign tour around Indiana, he stopped at Bloomington’s Branigin for President headquarters, where he spoke at an open house (25).</p>

<imgsrc=https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33908820110/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=Roger Branigin”>

<p>Indiana Historical Society</p>

<h3>April 23, 1970</h3>

<h4>Ford Speaks at IU</h4>

<p>At the time when Gerald Ford was the minority leader of the House of Representatives before he assumed the presidency, he gave a lecture at IU Bloomington. His speech centered on the progress of the Nixon administration and he praised Nixon’s foreign policy. The IU Student Foundation’s Symposium ’70 series sponsored Ford’s talk, which was attended by 600 people (26).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33023741914/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=” Gerald Ford speaking at Alumni Hall at IU Bloomington”>

<p>Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection. P0033039.</p>

<h3>April 2, 2008</h3>

<h4>Bill Clinton Campaigns for Hillary Clinton</h4>

<p>Former President Bill Clinton gave a talk at Assembly Hall as a part of Hillary Clinton’s “Hoosiers for Hillary Heartland Tour” for her presidential campaign. Clinton’s discussed Hillary Clinton’s plans for health care, the war in Iraq, and global warming. About 6,500 people attended the campaign speech (27).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rK2QbZxOhTk/alt=” Bill Clinton's entrance and introduction at Assembly Hall”>

<p>ngbauer. "Former President Bill Clinton Inro/Entrance at IU." April 2, 2008. YouTube.</p>

<h3>April 11, 2008</h3>

<h4>Obama Attends Little 500</h4>

<p>“For an hour Friday afternoon, every student on Kirkwood Avenue stopped drinking,” read an Indiana Daily Student story that covered presidential candidate Barack Obama’s surprise appearance at the Little 500 (28). After watching the women’s race at Bill Armstrong Stadium, Obama went to Nick’s English Hut to greet patrons. His surprise visit was a part of his campaign for the presidency in 2008.</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33331872193/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=” Obama stands and watches racers during the Women's Little 500”>

<p>James Brosher. Indiana Daily Student. April 12, 2008.</p>

<h3>April 25, 2008</h3>

<h4>Hillary Clinton Campaigns at IU</h4>

<p>As a part of her presidential campaign before the Democratic primary, Hillary Clinton spoke at IU’s Assembly Hall. Her talk centered on the 2008 financial crisis’ impact on student loans, and her plan to solve the growing economic pressures for college students (29).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33023742764/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=”Hillary Clinton speaking at Assembly Hall”>

<p> 2008 Arbutus</p>

<h3>April 30, 2008</h3>

<h4>Obama Holds Campaign Rally at IU</h4>

<p>13,000 people attended presidential hopeful Barack Obama’s speech during his campaign rally at IU’s Assembly Hall. According to an Indiana Daily Student article, the rally was “one part Hoosier Hysteria, one part rock concert and one part political theater" (30). Obama implored students to vote for him in the upcoming Indiana democratic primary. He discussed his plan to make college affordable, as well as other contemporary issues like global warming, the war in Iraq, and rising gas prices.</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/145186649@N02/33331885663/in/album-72157682264959825/alt=” Obama shakes hands at Assembly Hall during a rally”>

<p>Georgia Perry. Indiana Daily Student. May 2, 2008.</p>

<h3>April 27, 2016</h3>

<h4>Rally for Senator Sanders</h4>

<p>While campaigning during the Democratic primary, Bernie Sanders held a rally at IU Auditorium. The 3,000 seat auditorium was filled to capacity and Sanders also spoke to a crowd of several thousand people gathered outside. Sanders spoke on climate change, income inequality, and the effect of big money in politics, ultimately calling for political revolution (31).</p>

<imgsrc=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u-gTvQczjB4&spfreload=10/alt=” Bernie Sanders speaks to a crowd at IU Auditorium during a rally”>

<p>Madison Hogan. Indiana Daily Student. April 28, 2016.</p>

<h3>References</h>

<p> 1. Banta, David Demaree, "History of Indiana University: The Seminary Period (1820-1828)" (1889). David Banta (1889-1896). Paper 1. http://www.repository.law.indiana.edu/banta/1. 2. Statements, 1859 against William Daily by Indianapolis law partners William Wallace and (future U.S. President) Benjamin Harrison, 11 January 1859, William M. Daily collection, Collection C227, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 3. Rev. F.A. Hester’s charge to collect witness testimony for the Daily Trial by S.L. Gillet, 12 January 1859, William M. Daily collection, Collection C227, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 4. Statements, 1859 against William Daily by John Plowman, William M. Daily collection, Collection C227, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 5. Methodist Episcopal Church. Minutes of the Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church. New York: Published by T. Mason and G. Lane, 1840-1940. 6. Calhoun, Charles. Benjamin Harrison. New York: Times, 2005. 7. “General Harrison’s Vist.” Elletsville Farm [Elletsville, IN], 24 Oct. 1896, p. 8. 8. “Gen. Harrison’s Talk.” The Bloomington Telephone [Bloomington, IN], 23 Oct. 1896. 9. William Taft, Indiana University President's Office correspondence, Collection C286, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 10. “Crowd Packs Gymnasium to Hear Ex-President’s Speech.” Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 22 Jan. 1915, p. 1. 11. “Lawyers Give Taft Ovation at Dinner Here.” The Indianapolis Star, 22 Jan. 1915, p. 1. 12. Hebert Hoover, 1917-1918, Indiana University President's Office correspondence, Collection C286, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 13. John Allen, “The Food Administration of Herbert Hoover and American Voluntarism in the First World War,” Germina Veris, 1/1 (2014). Available at http://www.easternct.edu/germinaveris/the-food-administration-of-herbert-hoover-and-american-voluntarism-in-the-first-world-war/ 14. “Col. Roosevelt Heard By 8,000 People in his Commencement Address.” Bloomington Evening World [Bloomington, IN], 12 June 1918, p. 1. 15. Clark, Thomas Dionysius. Indiana University, Midwestern Pioneer. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1970. 16. Warren G. Harding, 1922. Indiana University President's Office correspondence, Collection C286, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 17. Scrapbooks, 1921-1943, Cosmopolitan Club records, Collection C237, Indiana University Archives. 18. Clippings and Correspondences, Cosmopolitan Club records, Collection C237, Indiana University Archives. 19. Bredemeier, Ken. “Nixon’s viewpoint enthusiastically received.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 18 Oct. 1965, p. 1. 20. Johnson, Lyndon B. “Remarks at a Luncheon for a Group of State University Presidents.” The American Presidency Project, 13 Aug. 1964. Accessed by http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/index.php?pid=26436. 21. Engdahl, Kathy. “Student Campaigners Praised by McCarthy.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 19 April 1968, p. 1. 22. “McCarthy asks participation.” Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 19 April 1968, p. 1. 23. Hicks, Jerry. “Kennedy talk in Auditorium set for 12:30.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 24 April 1968, p. 1. 24. Hicks, Jerry. “RFK suggests aid changes.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 25 April 1968, p. 1. 25. “Branigin here today; will tour campus and speak downtown.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 27 April 1968. 26. Hendricks, Merv. “Gerald Ford discusses opposition to Justice Douglas.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 24 April 1970, p. 5. 27. Brubeck, Sarah. “Former president charms crowd during IU visit.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 3 April 2008. Web. Accessed http://www.idsnews.com/article/2008/04/former-president-charms-crowd-during-iu-visit. 28. Zennie, Michael. “Barack Obama surprises students at Little 500, Nicks.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 12 April 2008. Web. Accessed http://www.idsnews.com/article/2008/04/barack-obama-surprises-students-at-little-500-nicks. 29. Zennie, Michael. “Clinton visits IU.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 20 April 2008. Web. Accessed http://www.idsnews.com/article/2008/04/clinton-visits-iu. 30. Zennie, Michael. “Obama: I need every Indiana student.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 1 May 2008. Web. Accessed http://www.idsnews.com/article/2008/05/obama-i-need-every-indiana-student. 31. Kruse, Nyssa. “Sanders calls for revolution.” The Indiana Daily Student [Bloomington, IN], 27 April 2016. Web. Accessed http://www.idsnews.com/article/2016/04/sanders-calls-for-a-revolution.</p>