1924

First Gay Rights Organization Founded

The Society for Human Rights (SHR), founded in Chicago, Illinois by Henry Gerber, was the first recognized gay rights organization in the United States. In order to keep it an exclusively homophile organization, Gerber and other members excluded bisexuals. Due to social stigma against homosexuality, SHR struggled to expand and accomplish its goals. Within a year of its inception, SHR ended after Gerber and other board members were arrested on various obscenity charges. (1)

Henry Gerber House, the site of the Society for Human Rights. Designated a National Historic Landmark in 2015.

Phil Velasquez, Chicago Tribune.

1945

First LGBTQ+ Veteran's Group Formed

A group of former soldiers founded the Veteran's Benevolent Association (VBA) in New York City as both a social outlet and activist organization. The VBA would later collaborate with the N.A.A.C.P. to campaign against blue discharges, a type of administrative military discharge that denied G.I. Bill benefits and disproportionately affected on gay and black military members. (2)

April 7th, 1947

Kinsey Institute Founded

Alfred Kinsey, a zoology professor at Indiana University, was the first researcher to use scientific observation to research human sexuality. He founded the Institute for Sex Research in Bloomington to study sex, gender, and reproduction. The Institute was later renamed the Kinsey Institute for Sex Research.

Institute of Sex Research staff, May 4, 1949.

Indiana University Archives Photograph Collection P0028497

1947

A Short History of the Kinsey Institute

1947

Kinsey Institute Founded

Throughout its history, the Kinsey Institute was highly controversial, drawing opposition from both the general public and government officials. According to Grafton Trout, an IU alumni, "over the period of the history of the Kinsey Institute there's always been somebody in the State Legislature who gets upset about it. And again he [Herman B Wells] was always saying well fine come and visit, we'll show you around. They usually kept quiet after that." As a result of his research into homosexuality, bisexuality, and heterosexuality, Kinsey postulated that sexuality did not exist as a strict binary and constructed the Kinsey Scale to illustrate that human sexuality instead exists as a spectrum. (3)

1948

First Kinsey Report Published

W.B. Saunders Company published the first Kinsey Report, Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, in 1948 as an objective survey of male sexual behavior in the United States. Alfred Kinsey, the primary contributor, analyzed data from a nationwide study of five thousand white men. The American public and scientific community considered this report to be groundbreaking as it revealed a proliferation of homosexual, extramarital, and premarital sexual activity. (4)

Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female.

Kinsey Institute Online Image Collection 19009

1951

Mattachine Society Founded

In 1951, Harry Hay founded the Mattachine Society (then known as the Mattachine Foundation), the first homophile organization in the United States. After being established in Los Angeles, the organization spread across the country and operated many separate chapters through the 1970s. Hay believed that the Mattachine Society was necessary to prevent the gay community from being targeted by the U.S. government. His experience in the American Communist Party influenced his ideals for how the society functioned, leading it to prioritize shared consciousness, education, and political action. However, by 1953 the original members had been passed over in favor of new leadership that promoted an assimilationist method of advocacy. (5)

1951

Second Kinsey Report Published

Five years after publishing Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, Alfred Kinsey published the second Kinsey Report, Sexual Behavior in the Human Female. The report challenged conventional American ideals of sexuality and society by revealing that sexual behavior often did not conform to what was considered "normal." The report's revelations of white women's sexual behavior created a great sensation in the country; many shocked Americans directed their resultant anger toward the Kinsey Institute and even toward Kinsey himself. (6)

Sexual Behavior in the Human Male and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female.

Kinsey Institute Online Image Collection 19009

October 19th, 1955

Daughters of Bilitis Founded

The Daughters of Bilitis (DOB), founded in 1955 in San Francisco, California, was the first American political and social organization for lesbian women. Named after a fictional bisexual woman, the organization focused on education and providing safe social spaces for lesbians. Some of their most successful social events were known as "gab n' java" sessions, where women could gather to discuss different topics. As the DOB expanded, chapters of the organization were founded across the country. (7)

August 1966

Compton's Cafeteria Riot

The Compton's Cafeteria Riot occurred in August 1966 in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco when police raided Compton's Cafeteria, targeting drag queens and transgender women. Compton's patrons, along with members of Vanguard (an equal rights organization) initially fought back by throwing objects at the police and smashing the glass windows of Compton's before the brawl spilled out onto the street. Although often overshadowed by the Stonewall Riots, this incident is one of the first LGBTQ+ riots in United States history. (8)

June 28th, 1969

Stonewall Riots

The Stonewall Riots took place at the Stonewall Inn in New York City when police raided the well-known gay bar and began arresting patrons, causing the gathered crowd to throw objects at them. Eventually the rebellion escalated and police barricaded themselves inside of the Stonewall Inn. Led by drag queens and transgender women, the crowds at Stonewall rioted until July 2nd. This five-day rebellion is generally considered to be the event that initiated the more radical gay rights movement that took place throughout the 1970s. (9)

Stonewall Inn.

Google Maps.

1970

Bloomington Gay Liberation Front Founded

One year after the initial founding of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) in New York City, queer IU students founded the Bloomington GLF. The group considered themselves to be non-violent revolutionaries. The organization focused on activism, but also served as a social space.

1970

Bloomington Gay Liberation Front Founded

In IU's 1972 Arbutus, the Bloomington GLF defined itself as, "a group of individuals who have banded together to help their gay brothers and sisters accept and be proud of their gayness so they won't hide in a false front defined by society but will be themselves 24 hours a day." Throughout the organization's history it has also been known as the Bloomington Gay Alliance and the Bloomington Gay and Lesbian Alliance. (10)

Bloomington Gay Liberation Front Group Photo

September 12th, 1975

New Horizons Gay Community Services Founded

New Horizons Gay Community Services was formed to provide information, crisis-intervention, and support to the gay community in Bloomington. The organization offered programs such as a gay awareness program for IU dorm coordinators; a "Wymin's night" that could include live music, playing games, or a slumber party; and a community newsletter. New Horizons also campaigned ardently in support of an amendment that would add "sexual orientation" and "marital status" to the Bloomington Human Rights Ordinance. (11)

December 1975

Gay Rights Ordinance Adopted in Bloomington

The Bloomington Human Rights Ordinance added a sexual orientation clause which prohibited discrimination against people based on their sexual orientation in employment, housing, or public accommodations. In opposition to this clause, 2,500 Bloomington residents signed a petition that supported the "elimination of homosexual activity" in Bloomington. Once adopted, this anti-discrimination measure also applied to the Indiana University Bloomington campus. (12)

August 1976

First IU Course on Gay Studies Offered

During the fall semester of 1976, Indiana University introduced a course titled "Introduction to Gay Studies" that would address views of homosexuality in different cultures and problems concerning homosexuality in contemporary America. "Introduction to Gay Studies" was taught by instructors from five different departments as an attempt to diversify the class. (13)

IU Sample Gates.

1981

Gay and Lesbian Concerns Committee Formed

Initiated by the Indiana University Student Association, the Gay and Lesbian Concerns Committee aimed to document harassment and discrimination against the gay community in Bloomington and at IU. The committee also provided solutions to this harassment and ensured that the gay and lesbian community at IU received the same rights as the straight student population. (14)

IU Office of University Archives and Records Management

March 1987

AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power founded

The AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power was founded in 1987 in response to the United States government's slow response in dealing with the AIDS crisis. Their well know slogan, "Silence=Death" encapsulated their direct action approach to advocating for change. They often participated in occupations and shut-downs in order to draw attention to the AIDS epidemic. They are also significant for their reclamation of the word "queer." (15)

November 1987

OUT at IU Founded

Originally an abbreviation for "Oh! U Too?," OUT was formed as Indiana University's Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender People's Union in November of 1987. OUT aimed to provide support and education for the GLBT community, engage in political and social actions for GLBT causes, and inform the wider Bloomington/IU community on GLBT issues. Every year, OUT held annual events such as Pride Week, Lesbopolooza and the Miss Gay IU Pageant. Additionally, the organization created the Safe Zone campaign in 1996, a nationally recognized project that focused on ensuring a safe campus environment for all minority students.

IU Office of University Archives and Records Management

November 1987

OUT at IU Founded

One former participant of OUT remarked, "I can remember like they would bring in films and stuff and I can remember that's where I saw the film about Harvey Milk, the documentary. I really started to realize that there was a lot more to being gay and being part of this community than just going out to the bars every night. It was like this guy had been taken away from us and it was very tragic and I think that's when I got some sense of political awareness." (16)

1990

GLB Educational Task Force Founded

Michael Gordon, then Dean of Students, appointed an Educational Task Force for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Concerns. Working in conjunction with OUT and IUSA, the Task Force aimed to identify resources for and address issues pertaining to LGB students. In 1992, the Task Force released a survey to be filled out by LGB students in order to understand and improve the lives of IU's queer community. (17)

IU Office of University Archives and Records Management

May 3rd, 1994

Center for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Concerns Authorized

After a campus center for gay, lesbian, and bisexual concerns was authorized by the Budgetary Affairs Committee, Indiana University's administration allotted fifty thousand dollars to fund the Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Student Support Services Office. Although lauded by many, this resulted in a backlash from many students, alumni, and community members.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1994-1998. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.

May 3rd, 1994

Center for Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Concerns Authorized

According to Eric Todd, a member of the Board of Aeons that recommended the establishment of the GLBSSS in 1989, "I think there was a feeling that there probably would be some push back but that we felt like there was enough momentum and if the university got squarely behind it, that those kinds of issues would fade fairly quickly over time." (18)

October 14th, 1994

GLB Office Denied Public Funding Amid Controversy

Just months after the authorization of the GLB Office, then Indiana University President Miles Brand announced that the office would be sustained by private donations instead of public funding. This decision, made due to a threat of retaliation against IU by conservative politicians also included rebranding the office as The Office of Student Ethics and Anti-Harassment Programs.

 Protest of President Brand's decision.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1994-1998.

October 14th, 1994

GLB Office Denied Public Funding Amid Controversy

Enraged by what they viewed as a betrayal against the LGBTQ+ community, many students protested both the change in name and funding through a campaign called Zero Tolerance, which led to the eventual reversal of the change in name. (19)

 Zero Tolerance Sticker

IU Archives

November 9th, 1994

Coordinator for GLB Office Named

In November of 1994, Doug Bauder was named as the coordinator for the Office of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Student Support Services. Bauder is quoted in the IDS as aiming to "focus real early on in terms of building bridges within the community, establishing a coalition of people who want this to happen." (20)

January 27th, 1995

GLB Office Grand Opening

The grand opening of the GLB Office took place at the beginning of Indiana University's spring semester in 1995, although the office officially opened on November 21st of 1994. Over 300 people attended the grand opening celebration, where they learned how the office aimed to provide support for queer students and staff at IU, while also serving an educational purpose for the university at large. In the years following the center's inception, the acronym GLB would be expanded to GLBT, with the "T" added to represent the transgender community. (21)

GLBTSSS Office Scrapbook, 1994-1998.

1996

GLBT Alumni Association Founded

Founded in 1996, the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Alumni Association (GLBTAA) allowed LGBTQ+ alumni of IU to publicly support the university and its LGBTQ students through avenues such as scholarships for queer students and funding student groups within the GLBT office. (22)

GLBTAA Brochure.

IU Office of University Archives and Records Management

October 12th, 1998

IU Vigil for Matthew Shepard

Matthew Shepard, a gay college student at the University of Wyoming, was murdered on October 12th of 1998 due to his sexual orientation. A vigil for Shepard sponsored by OUT and the GLBT Office was held in Dunn Meadow two days later, with over 100 people in attendance. The vigil began with several students and faculty members speaking out about the impact of Shepard's death, followed by the lighting of candles.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1996-2002.

October 12th, 1998

IU Vigil for Matthew Shepard

Later, the participants chalked the sidewalks surrounding the GLBT Office to express their sentiments and wrote notes of sympathy to Shepard's family. One participant recounted that it was, "an important moment of focus and reflection for the IU community - unlike any I have experienced since arriving here." (23)

Chalk outside GLBT Office.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1996-2002.

April 7th, 1999

IU Participates in Day of Silence

On the third annual National Day of Silence, which was conceived at the University of Virginia in 1996, the IU and Bloomington community participated by choosing to remain silent throughout the day in support of LGBTQ+ rights. A gathering was held at the Sample Gates so participants could observe the last fifteen minutes of silence together before community members spoke about the significance of the day. (24)

IU Day of Silence Article.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1996-2002.

April 7th, 1999

Transgender Day of Remembrance Founded

Gwendolyn Ann Smith, an activist and transgender woman, founded the Transgender Day of Remembrance, an international day of action held annually on November 20th. The day served to memorialize the death of Rita Hester, a black transgender woman who was murdered in 1998 in Allston, Massachusetts. (25)

Transgender Day of Remembrance Flier.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2007-2009.

September 15th, 2001

Domestic Partner Policy Adopted at IU

Indiana University Administration elected to adopt a domestic partner policy that would provide health insurance and other benefits to the partners of LGBTQ+ faculty, staff, and students. This allowed for greater recognition of couples who could not legally marry. (26)

July 19th, 2002

First Annual Sexual Minority Youth in the HeartLand Conference

The Sexual Minority Youth in the HeartLand (SMYHL) Conference was held for the first time in 2002. This conference aimed to assist educators and others who worked closely with youth to support LGBTQ+ young people.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2001-2004.

July 19th, 2002

First Annual Sexual Minority Youth in the HeartLand Conference

The City of Bloomington, initially planning on providing a financial sponsorship for the conference, elected to withdraw their funding due to fears that the conference was intended to counter a nearby Boy Scouts Conference. Despite this, the conference was successful, with Indiana University's GLBT Student Support Services serving as the primary sponsor. (28)

June 3rd, 2002 - November 5th, 2002

Series of Anti-Homosexuality Protests

During a span of five months, the Old Paths Baptist Church, located in Campbellsburg, IN, led inflammatory protests in Bloomington and Indiana University. Toting signs with slogans such as "God Hates Fags" and "Got AIDS Yet?", members of the religious group hollered at those passing by Peoples Park on Kirkwood on Monday, July 3rd. A scuffle broke out between the protestors and those who opposed their bigotry, which ended when the Bloomington Police Department arrested one of the people attempting to take the derogatory signs from the protestors.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2001-2004.

June 3rd, 2002 - November 5th, 2002

Series of Anti-Homosexuality Protests

Throughout the rest of the summer and into the fall, the Old Paths Baptist Church staged a series of anti-LGBTQ+, anti-Muslim, anti-Catholic, and anti-abortion protests. After two protests by the religious group, pro-LGBTQ+ groups such as Bloomington United and GLBT Student Support Services organized a gathering at Bloomington Bagel to march down Kirkwood Avenue with signs in an attempt to counteract the previous negative protests. (27)

October 2003

WFHB Launched bloomingOUT

bloomingOUT, a radio show meant to focus on issues pertaining to the LGBTQ+ community, began broadcasting in October of 2003. At the time, it served as the first media distribution for the LGBT community since the end of the Bloomington Beacon [a newsletter]. (29)

January 31st, 2004

Bloomington's First LGBTQ+ Film Festival

Two IU students organized Bloomington's first LGBT film festival, PRIDE. Shown at the Buskirk-Chumley Theatre, the film festival screened various short films that addressed the LGBTQ+ community. Just five years later, the film festival had grown to sell two thousand tickets and twelve years later is a staple of the Bloomington and Indiana University LGBTQ+ community. (30)

First Pride Film Festival Brochure.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2001-2004.

June 2004

Black Like Us founded

Black Like Us founder Tahirah Akbar-Williams sought out other members of the black LGBTQ+ community in response to the scant attention received by the 2003 murder of 15-year-old black lesbian Sakia Gunn. Black Like Us held its first meeting in June of 2004 and sought to create a safe space to discuss sexuality and identity. According to Akbar-Williams, "a lot of people, because of the double or triple consciousness in racism and homophobia… don't step out. My biggest accomplishment has been showing them that you can be one community and be proud of your orientation, and you don't have to hide it. I wanted to people to see that." (31)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2003-2005.

November 9th-14th, 2004

GLBT Office 10th Anniversary

Although the GLBT Office faced stout resistance to becoming an accepted center on Indiana University's campus when it officially opened in 1994, its staunch supporters ensured its success. To commemorate the GLBT Office's 10th anniversary, a weeklong celebration took place from November 9th through November 14th in 2004. The events included a discussion of black gay and lesbian representation in the media, a showing of the film "Kinsey", a concert, a Reunion Reception, and the GLBT "Spirit" Award presentation. The 10th anniversary of the Office also served as an opportunity to call for improvements in the office building, with hopes that those improvements would allow the Office to better serve the IU and Bloomington community. (32)

November 9th, 2004 - February 24th, 2005

Second Series of Anti-Homosexuality Protests

Two years after its first series of protests, Old Paths Baptist Church once again led a series of recurring anti-homosexuality demonstrations in Bloomington and at IU. Initially protesting outside of the IU School of Law in November of 2004, the religious group transitioned to occupying the pathways between Ballantine Hall and Woodburn Hall by February of 2005.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2003-2005.

November 9th, 2004 - February 24th, 2005

Second Series of Anti-Homosexuality Protests

As the church protested on a near weekly basis, Indiana University students began carrying signs that stated, "Bloomington United in Diversity" and gathered to counter-protest the religious groups anti-LGBTQ+, anti-abortion, anti-Buddhism, and anti-Muslim message. (33)

 Clash on Old Path Article

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2003-2005.

March 8th, 2005

Proposed Ban on Same-Sex Marriage in Indiana

On March 8th, 2005, the IU LGBTQ+ community reacted in protest to the proposed ban on same-sex marriage in Indiana. Demonstrators gathered at the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis to stand against Bill SJR7. A group of students from IU, accompanied by Doug Bauder, director of the IU GLBT Office, attended the rally and then entered the Statehouse to directly oppose members of Advance America, who supported Bill SJR7. (34)

Storming the Statehouse Article.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2003-2005.

April 30th, 2005

First Bloomington AIDS Walk

The Student Global AIDS Campaign organized the Bloomington AIDS Walk in order to raise money for Positive Link, a group out of the Bloomington Hospital that offered HIV testing and assisted those diagnosed with HIV. Over 130 people pre-registered to participate in the 2.5 mile walk around Indiana University's campus, marking the event a successful fundraiser. (35)

April 22nd, 2006

First GLBTSSS-Sponsored Little 500 Team

Rainbow Riders, the first Little 500 team to be sponsored by the GLBT Office, was founded by four LGBTQ+ allies who believed in promoting diversity and supporting the LGBTQ community in the face of bigotry.

Rainbow Riders.

Reaching Out Newsletter.

April 22nd, 2006

First GLBTSSS-Sponsored Little 500 Team

Utilizing the rainbow flag as a symbol and co-sponsored by the IU Office of Diversity Education, Todd Diemer, Patrick Richardson, Gary Shoulders, and Jacob Sinex qualified for the Little 500 and ultimately placed twenty-seventh in the race. A few years later, Jacob Sinex coached the women's Rainbow Cycling team, which also represented the LGBTQ+ community in the Little 500. (36)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2005-2006.

July 11th, 2006

IU Ranked one of Top 20 Gay-Friendly Campuses

The Advocate College Guide for LGBT Students, a guide produced by the LGBT magazine The Advocate, recorded Indiana University as being a LGBT-progressive campus. The guide cited examples of progressiveness such as Herman B Wells' support for Kinsey's sex research and the success of the GLBT Office. (37)

February 13th-15th, 2009

The Midwest Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, Ally College Conference Held

The Midwest Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, Ally College Conference (MBLGTACC) was based at Indiana University for the first time in 2009, where over one thousand five hundred people attended.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2007-2009.

February 13th-15th, 2009

The Midwest Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Transgender, Ally College Conference Held

Conference participants were given the opportunity to engage with workshops, art displays, and performances with topics relating the LGBTQ+ community. (38)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2008-2010.

February 2010

LOUTin@s Founded

LOUTin@s, a Latino LGBTQ+ group, derived their name from a play on the word Latinos, with the @ symbol representing all genders. The director of La Casa Latino Cultural Center, Lillian Casillas, said of the group, "We have a diverse Latino population," and, "part of that diversity is that we have different gender orientations, identities. This is just one organization that can provide support to our students and provide allies as well." (39)

October 2010

BlaqueOUT Founded

IU senior Ashley Rhodes formed the student organization BlaqueOUT to further promote inclusion for LGBTQ+ people of color and as a reconstruction of the then defunct group Black Like Us. BlaqueOUT sought to address the specific needs of queer people of color as those needs are sometimes overlooked in other LGBTQ+ organizations. (40)

March 26th, 2013

Bloomington Rally for Marriage Equality

Over one hundred people gathered on the steps of the Bloomington Courthouse to support gay rights and marriage equality, with chants such as "Gay or straight, black or white, marriage is a civil right." As the participants waved rainbow flags and held signs reading "equality now", the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments concerning California's ban on same-sex marriage. The Bloomington rally was one of many held across the country as the Supreme Court declared Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act, which defined marriage as exclusively between a man and a woman, to be unconstitutional. (41)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2012-2013.

September 2013

GLBTAA Scholarship Campaign Announced

In 2013, the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Alumni Association announced that they would conduct a fundraising campaign to establish what would be the first scholarship fund for LGBTQ+ students officially sanctioned by a university. The scholarship was meant to support students of Indiana University who were in need of emergency financial help, as well as students involved in the campus LGBTQ+ community. The campaign surpassed its aim to raise 1 million dollars and the GLBTAA achieved a stable fund for scholarships. (42)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2013-2014.

January 2014

IU Health Center Reforms Transgender Policies

The IU Health Center and GLBTSSS collaborated to reform the Health Center's transgender policies. They sought to create a secure form that would ensure the accessibility of transgender patients' names and pronouns to all Health Center employees. Additionally, the Health Center staff underwent training on awareness of the health issues faced by transgender individuals and proper conduct and etiquette in caring for transgender patients. IU Health Center Director Peter Grogg stated, "As a health care facility, we should be the last place anyone should feel uncomfortable coming to." (43)

June 25th, 2014

Marriage Ban Temporarily Lifted

After federal judges struck down Indiana's ban on same-sex marriage as unconstitutional, same-sex marriage was temporarily legalized on Wednesday, June 25, 2014. Later that afternoon, at least 19 LGBTQ+ couples were married at the Charlotte T. Zietlow Justice Center in downtown Bloomington.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2014-2015.

June 25th, 2014

Marriage Ban Temporarily Lifted

However, by Friday of that week a federal appeals court issued a stay on same-sex marriages, meaning no further couples could marry after the initial two-day legalization. Additionally, Governor Mike Pence's office stated that Indiana would ignore the marriages that had already taken place, appealing the case and sending it to the circuit court. The ban would once again be temporarily lifted for one day on September 4th, before being appealed for the last time at the U.S. Supreme Court. (44)

September 6th, 2014

Bloomington's First Summer Pridefest

Bloomington Pride held its first annual Summerfest, a day-long street festival and block party to celebrate the LGBTQ+ community. Events at Summerfest included a drag show, musical performances, discussions and workshops on topics such as race and gender identity, and keynote speaker Dr. Kand McQueen. Nicci Boroski, one of the organizers for the Summerfest, stated, "I think any marginalized community, and there's a lot of those, who don't have full rights need to be able to celebrate themselves because it's hard to live in that reality. For folks to be able to know everyone around them is a part of a supportive community and that everyone in a room supports their existence is just invaluable." (45)

Grossman, Suzanne. "Bloomington Group Presents First Pride Summerfest." Indiana Daily Student (Bloomington), September 07, 2014.

October 6th, 2014

Marriage Equality in Indiana

Following the temporary legalization of same-sex marriage in June and September, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear appeals regarding the cases of same-sex marriage legality. Because of this, the decision reverted to the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals' ruling that a ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional. The ruling also resulted in marriage equality in Utah, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Oklahoma. (46)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015.

November 19th, 2014

GLBT Office Celebrates 20th Anniversary

The GLBTSSS Office celebrated the 20th anniversary of the office's official opening by taking time to reflect on the progress the office had made by providing support to LGBTQ+ students at Indiana University and hosting events that promoted education and awareness about LGBTQ+ issues. Additionally, plans were made to further increase the diversity of the office by better addressing women's and transgender issues and concerns of people of color, polyamory, and asexuality. (47)

November 19th, 2014

GLBT Office Celebrates 20th Anniversary

April 26th, 2015

RFRA Signed by Govenor Mike Pence

When Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), protests erupted in Indiana, including in Bloomington. Although Pence signed legislation to clarify RFRA, he refused to make sexuality and gender identity protected classes in Indiana.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015.

April 26th, 2015

RFRA Signed by Governor Mike Pence

Governor Pence also cancelled his appearance for the Monroe County Republican Party's Lincoln Day Dinner after a protest was planned against RFRA outside of the venue at Karst Farm Park. The protest still took place with hundreds gathering to listen to speakers and protest the law. (48)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015.

June 26th, 2015

Marriage Equality

Ruling that same-sex marriage is a right guaranteed by the Constitution, the Supreme Court legalized marriage equality in all 50 states. Throughout the country, people gathered to commemorate and celebrate. In Bloomington, community members participated in a rally at the Monroe County Courthouse Square to celebrate.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015.

August 2015

First LGBTQ+ IU Dorm Community

Spectrum, a LGBTQ+ floor, began during the fall semester of 2015 in Teter Residence Center. Spectrum fosters a supportive and inclusive environment for IU students in the queer community. Throughout the school year, Spectrum hosts outreach activities to engage with and inform the IU community about LGBTQ+ issues. (49)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015.

June 12th, 2015

Pulse Nightclub Shooting

Around 2 a.m. on Sunday morning, a deadly shooting occurred inside Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida. 49 patrons were killed and 53 injured during the attack, which took place during Pulse's Latino night. This tragedy and act of hate against the LGBTQ+ community drew a national response, including in Bloomington.

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015-2016.

June 14th, 2015

Pulse Nightclub Shooting

Two days later, on June 14th, a vigil organized by Bloomington Pride took place at Bloomington City Hall, with Kyle Hayes, a board member and volunteer coordinator of Bloomington Pride, stating that the vigil would show, "We're not afraid to assemble; we're not afraid to be together; and we're not afraid to be seen in public. We're never going to change who we are based on the fear they tried to inflict upon us." Over 1,000 people attended the vigil, listening to speakers before candles were distributed to the attendees and lit as the names of the forty-nine victims were read aloud. (50)

GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015-2016.

2017

References: 1. Katz, Jonathan, Gay American History: Lesbians and Gay Men In the U.S.A.: A Documentary History. Rev. ed. New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Meridian, 1992, 584-91.2. Bérubé, Allan. Coming Out Under Fire: The History of Gay Men and Women In World War Two. New York: Free Press, 1990, 139, 230. 3. Eaklor, Vicki Lynn. Queer America: A GLBT History of the 20th Century. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2008, 80, 100-101. 4. Eaklor, Vicki Lynn. Queer America: A GLBT History of the 20th Century. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2008, 80. 5. Eaklor, Vicki Lynn. Queer America: A GLBT History of the 20th Century. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2008, 96-97. 6. Eaklor, Vicki Lynn. Queer America: A GLBT History of the 20th Century. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2008, 80, 100. 7. Marcus, Eric. Making History: The Struggle for Gay and Lesbian Equal Rights, 1945-1990: An Oral History. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 1992, 70-77, 112-117. 8. Stryker, Susan, and Victor Silverman. Screaming Queens: The Riot at Compton's Cafeteria. [San Francisco, California, USA]: Kanopy Streaming, 2015. 9. Eaklor, Vicki Lynn. Queer America: A GLBT History of the 20th Century. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2008, 80, 122-23.10. Eaklor, Vicki Lynn. Queer America: A GLBT History of the 20th Century. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2008, 123-27. and Indiana University 1972 Arbutus, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.

2017

11. Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.12. Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.13. Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.14. Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.15. Eaklor, Vicki Lynn. Queer America: A GLBT History of the 20th Century. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2008.16. Indiana University Bicentennial Oral History Project, Sara Julian, Interview by Carrie Schwier, and Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.17. Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.18. Indiana University Bicentennial Oral History Project, Eric Todd, Interview by Dina Kellems, and GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1994-1998. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.19. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1994-1998. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. and Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.20. GLBTSSS Office Scrapbook, 1994-1998. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.

2017

21. GLBTSSS Office Scrapbook, 1994-1998. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. and Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 22. Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 23. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1996-2002. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 24. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1996-2002. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 25. Eaklor, Vicki Lynn. Queer America: A GLBT History of the 20th Century. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2008. 26. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 1996-2002. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 27. GLBTSSS Office Scrapbook, 2001-2004. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 28. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2001-2004. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 29. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2001-2004. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.30. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2001-2004. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.

2017

31. Reaching Out, Indiana University Alumni Association, vol. 9, No. 1, Winter 2005-06. IU Archives, GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2003-2005. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 32. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2003-2005. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 33. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2003-2005. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 34. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2003-2005. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 35. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2005-2006. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 36. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2005-2006. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. and Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records, Collection C435, Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 37. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2005-2006. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 38. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office Scrapbook, 2007. and GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2007-2008. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 39. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2008-2010. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 40. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2010-2011. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington.

2017

41. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2012-2013. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 42. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2013-2014. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 43. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2013-2014. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 44. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2014-2015. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 45. Grossman, Suzanne. "Bloomington Group Presents First Pride Summerfest." Indiana Daily Student (Bloomington), September 07, 2014. 46. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 47. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 48. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 49. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. 50. GLBTSSS Scrapbook, 2015-2016. Office of University Archives and Records Management, Indiana University, Bloomington. and "Candlelight vigil for Orlando victims unites community." Herald-Times [Bloomington, IN] 15 June 2016.